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Paul Michael Hughes/Guinness World Records (Takahiro Ikeda, Skye Broberg); Hailey Ross/The Free Lance-Star/AP Photo (Katie Borka); Stephen Yang (Daniel Rose-Levine); Ranald Mackechnie/Guinness World Records (Shridhar Chillal)


How To Be A Record-Breaker

Here’s what it takes to make it into the world’s best-selling record book.

As You Read: Find three world records described in the article. Think about the different skills that might be needed for each one.

When Daniel Rose-Levine was 8, he loved reading a book called Guinness World Records (GWR). Daniel imagined setting his own record one day.

It didn’t take long. Daniel, now 16, is proud to appear in the book’s 2020 edition. He earned a spot by solving a Rubik’s Cube in under 17 seconds—with his feet! 

Do you dream of breaking a record? Keep reading to see how it’s done!

When Daniel Rose-Levine was 8, he loved a book called Guinness World Records (GWR). He imagined setting his own record.

It didn’t take long. Daniel is now 16. And he is proud to appear in the book’s 2020 edition. He earned a spot by solving a Rubik’s Cube in under 17 seconds—with his feet!

Do you dream of breaking a record? Here’s how it’s done!

Find Your Talent

First, choose a record to smash. Try paging through GWR for ideas. Or think of something you’re good at. Daniel began solving Rubik’s Cubes at camp. He discovered he had talent for it and was soon winning competitions. 

“I started with my hands,” he says. “I switched to feet when I hurt my hands from cubing so much.”

You can even go for a record that no one has tried before. That’s what 11-year-old Katie Borka did. She liked looking for “lucky” four-leaf clovers. So she tried setting a new record for finding them. She found 166 in one hour—and made it into GWR

First, choose a record. You can try paging through GWR for ideas. Or think of something you’re good at. Daniel began solving Rubik’s Cubes at camp. He discovered he had talent for it. He was soon winning competitions.

“I started with my hands,” he says. “I switched to feet when I hurt my hands from cubing so much.”

You can even go for a record that no one has tried before. That’s what 11-year-old Katie Borka did. She liked looking for four-leaf clovers. So she tried setting a new record for finding them. She found 166 in one hour. And she made it into GWR.

Know the Rules

Every record has rules to follow. In fact, some records are not even open to kids younger than 16 for safety reasons. So be sure to visit the book’s website to ask for the guidelines. 

The Guinness rules explain what kind of evidence you must collect to prove you set a record. For example, Katie learned that she needed to have expert witnesses, timers, and a video of her clover search.

“Do your homework before attempting a record,” says Guinness senior editor Adam Millward. “If you don’t, your attempt might not count.”

Every record has rules to follow. Some records are not even open to kids for safety reasons. So be sure to visit the book’s website to ask for the rules.

The rules tell what evidence you must collect to prove you set a record. For example, Katie learned that she needed to have expert witnesses, timers, and a video of her clover search.

“Do your homework before attempting a record,” says Guinness senior editor Adam Millward. “If you don’t, your attempt might not count.”

Practice Until Perfect

Practicing a record attempt can help you nail it. In 2018, a team of kids in Japan set a record for the most jump rope jumps in one minute using a single rope. They practiced for hours and hours beforehand.

Finally, go for the record and send in your evidence. If the Guinness team accepts your evidence, it will declare that you are an official world record holder. 

“You will know you are the best of the best at something,” says Millward. “You will be able to lay claim to something that nobody else on the planet can.”

Practicing a record attempt is important. In 2018, kids in Japan set a record for the most jump rope jumps in one minute using a single rope. They practiced for hours beforehand.

Finally, go for the record and send in your evidence. If Guinness accepts your evidence, it will make you an official world record holder.

“You will know you are the best of the best at something,” says Millward. “You will be able to lay claim to something that nobody else on the planet can.”    

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